Grants
Governing Compound Disasters in Urbanizaing Asia
Description

The expansion of the Disaster Governance theme has been facilitated by an MOE Tier-2 grant on Governing Compound Disasters in Urbanizing Asia [MOE2014-T2-1-017], awarded in 2014. Led by the AUC, this 3-year multidisciplinary programme involves cooperation with ARI's Asian Urbanisms and Science, Technology and Society cluster. It aims to improve understandings of the changing risks, vulnerabilities, responses and resilience to compounded environmental disasters in an increasingly interconnected urbanizing Asia. Research on Disaster Governance in an age of urban transitions and global climate change has produced extensive international research collaborations and publications, with a longer term objective of establishing Singapore as a centre of leadership in Asia in the growing field of Disaster Studies. The programme is the only university-based disaster research effort in Asia that brings together the social sciences, humanities, natural sciences and related technical disciplines.


Our mission:

  • Explore Asia’s diverse urban experiences: historically, contemporaneously, and towards the future
  • Contribute to theory and applied research through comparative studies with other world region
  • Publish research that speaks in transformative ways to urban-related theories, debates and public policy issue
  • Fill missing gaps in humanities and social sciences perspectives
Investigator(s)
Michael DOUGLASS
Duration
01 September 2014 to 30 September 2017
Making Identity Count in Asia: Identity Relations in Singapore and its Neighborhood
Description

This is a three-year grant commencing in September 2017 awarded by the newly-created Singapore Social Science Research Council. It involves investigating the national identities of all ASEAN countries, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2015.  The national identities of these countries will be recovered using discourse analysis of mass and elite texts in each country Singapore will also be a testbed for multiple methodological approaches beyond discourse analysis, including a national survey, focus groups, ethnographies, and an analysis of social media.  Monographs and research articles are planned on the identity relations among these states, between these states and great powers, the national identity projects of these states, as well as on multiple methodological approaches to studying national identity. The project involves NUS faculty from Political Science, Sociology, Southeast Asian Studies, History, as well as from Yale-NUS, SMU, and NTU. The project is related to the Making Identity Count project which aims at creating a large-n interpretivist national identity database for all great powers from 1810-2010. The first publication from that project is Making Identity Count (Oxford 2016).

Investigator(s)
Ted HOPF
Duration
01 September 2017 to 31 August 2020
Migrants in Global Cities: Experiences from Asia, the Gulf and Europe
Description

This international collaborative workshop is convened by the National University of Singapore (Asia Research Institute) and the Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (USPC)’s interdisciplinary program Sociétés Plurielles (Diverse Societies). It aims to bring together scholars working on Asia, the Middle East and Europe with respect to questions of global city making, migration diversity and cosmopolitan urbanities. This collaboration will enrich the understanding of global city-making processes by emphasizing the role played by international migration. It will also develop a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective on how migration impacts cities in the regions mentioned. Questions it seeks to address are:

  • How are they linked through flows of migrants and what motivates the direction of various flows?

  • How are these cities connected with and embedded within migrant transnational networks?

  • What are the benefits of approaching regionally specific happenings in a comparative perspective

(PI)s  Prof Brenda Yeoh and Prof Delphine Pages-El Karoui

Investigator(s)
Brenda YEOH
Duration
02 May 2017 to 30 April 2018
Migrating Out of Poverty Research Programme Consortium (RPC) (2010 – 2017)
Description

Migrating Out of Poverty is an international research consortium focused on the relationship between migration, poverty, and development. Building on the success of the University of Sussex’s Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty (Migration DRC), the Consortium aims to provide high-quality research evidence that will contribute to improving policies that impact the lives and well-being of migrants, their communities and countries through a programme of innovative research, capacity building, and policy engagement. Four major themes that inform the Consortium’s research agenda include: i) migration drivers in and from poor countries; ii) migration impacts on poverty reduction; iii) migration policies; and iv) migration data. For details, see section below on Highlights of Major Projects.

Awarding Body: UK Department for International Development (DFID)

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Investigator(s)
Jia Min Charmian GOHSilvia Mila ARLINIBrenda YEOHLAM Choy Fong TheodoraMaria PLATTGrace BAEYMiriam EEKHOO Choon YenKellynn WEE
Duration
01 January 2010 to 01 December 2017
Religion and NGOs in Asia
Description

The project is designed to explore the ways in which interactions between the spheres of ‘religion’ and ‘development’ are shaping transformations in both fields through focused examinations of engagements of religious NGOs in Asia with policy and regulatory frameworks at multiple levels – sub-national, national, and transnational.


Our work is focused on four dimensions: policies implemented by states towards religious NGOs, policies of development organizations in engaging with religious NGOs, policies and tactics of religious NGOs in responding to states and transnational actors, and internal policies and practices of religious NGOs.

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Investigator(s)
Michael FEENERKenneth DEANPhilip FOUNTAINRobin BUSHWU KepingCatherine SCHEER Giuseppe BOLOTTA
Duration
01 April 2015 to 31 December 2017
Sustainable Governance of Transboundary Environmental Commons in Southeast Asia
Description

As a small, island city-state, Singapore is closely interconnected, economically, environmentally and politically, with regional neighbours in Southeast Asia.  The resilience and reliability of these interconnections have facilitated economic growth, regional stability and cordial diplomatic relations.  Development benefits in the region have not come without costs, however; rising living standards are associated with increasing rates of resource extraction, reduced environmental quality and impoverishment of biodiversity that have negative ramifications for exposed population groups.  Often the negative environmental impacts are transboundary, impacting populations, activities and environments great distances and in different jurisdictions from the locations of resource extraction.

 This project involves research on transboundary environmental commons in Southeast Asia, with collaborating partners in Singapore, Canada, Malaysia, Thailand, Laos and Indonesia. More specifically the research seeks to:

1) identify the drivers and impacts associated with two major transboundary environmental challenges impacting land, water and atmosphere in Southeast Asia i.e. biomass burning and haze, and hydropower development and water resources;

2) examine these transboundary challenges in the context of the governance of transboundary environmental commons, or common pool resources, within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), as well as the identification of relevant best practices worldwide; and

3) contribute to environmental sustainability within ASEAN, as well as provide an evidence-based foundation for policy-making and implementation at both national and ASEAN levels that enhances Singapore’s reputation as a responsible neighbour and a leader in sustainability sciences

 

 

Investigator(s)
Jonathan RIGGDavid Taylor
Duration
01 August 2017 to 31 July 2022
Transnationalism and Diaspora: Enhancing demography’s contribution to migration and development
Description

The replacement of permanent movements by transnationalism as the dominant paradigm in migration studies has raised new questions for demographic measurement and study of migration. This study rethinks demographic concepts of population and migration to incorporate elements such as diaspora, circular migration, and transnational linkages. It shows how use of traditional demographic data with integrated quantitative and qualitative research can yield important insights into diaspora, in particular, the diaspora–migration–development nexus. Four country case studies are undertaken to increase understanding of the characteristics of diasporas, their international linkages, and their potential for enhancing development in origin countries.

Investigator(s)
Brenda YEOH, Andrew Rosser, Fei Guo, Yan Tan
Duration
01 June 2017 to 31 December 2020